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. but they're very small. it's a very small part of the navy. >> in the marine corps' completely separate from the navy now. >> dairy sector service inside the department of the navy. but this became really contentious throughout the course of history. a corporate claim and they served aboard ship that they should follow the rules of the navy, the regulation of the department of the navy. when they served assurer to the army bishop of the regulation of the army and eventually in 1832? became a separate service inside the department. >> out of their mission change? >> commission didn't change so much then. there've been ship cards offer to the 20th century, but they were something of a jack of all trades. they would do other jobs as well, most often serving as landing parties in the navy would send sailors on punitive expeditions, the marines would always participate in that. in the start of the 20th century company took on a variety of other missions, colonial infantry in haiti, philippines, nicaragua and before world war ii, they started creating amphibious landing forces. they became ex
book "the warrior's heart". an adaptation of his memoirs of becoming a navy seal. this is just under an hour. [applause] >> a round of applause. thank you very much. one of the things that is fun about being here, i am from st. louis. it is good to do these things. i have some wonderful people who saved my life, my second grade teacher is with me tonight. welcome hats. [applause] >> if this book can have the kind of defect on one person's like that hat and my other teachers had on me it will be a very successful books so thank you for being out here tonight. i appreciate it. i will begin the book reading from the beginning where i asked young people to imagine themselves in a navy seal training and this is how it starts. you stand in freezing water up to your chest. every muscle in your body throbs with pain. you are exhausted beyond anything you could ever imagine and all around you the night air curses and groans and others who are getting it out like you, trying to survive the night. most won't. you know the statistics. one in ten will make it through this week, will survive hours
"the warrior's heart" an app adaptation of becoming a navy seal for young adultings. this is just under an hour. [applause] >> thank you. [applause] thank you very much. [applause] thank you so much. [applause] thank you. can i get a round of applause for will? [cheers and applause] fantastic, buddy, thank you very much. [applause] thank you. one of the things that's follow-up for me about being here tonight as gary mentioned, i'm from st. louis, good to do these things in st. louis, and i have wonderful people who shaped my life who are in the front row. my second grade teacher here with me tonight. welcome pat. [applause] i know that if this book can have the kind of effect on just one person's life that pat and my other teachers had on me, this will be a very successful book so thank you very much for being out here tonight. i appreciate. i'm going to begin the book reading right from the very beginning of the book where i asked young people to imagine themselves in the navy seal training, and this is how it starts. you stand in freezing water up to your chest. every muscle in
from the very beginning where i asked jack people to imagine themselves in the navy seals training. this is out its starts. you stand in freezing water up to your chest. every muscle in your body throbs with pain. you're exhausted beyond anything you could ever imagine, and all around you the night air carries the curses and groans of others who are getting it out like you, trying to survive the night. most won't. you know the statistics. maybe one in ten will make it through this we can survive hours, days of the punishment required to become a navy s.e.a.l. that water is dark around you, but you can make out lights on the beach. roy member your instructors words as the center toward the horizon, their voices booming over the bull horn. say goodnight to the sun. the night is going to be a very, very long night. your imagine another hundred hours of this. you see yourself plunging over and over into the icy water pulling yourself out again. you imagine endless repetition of ceps, flutter kicks, pushups. surf torture, they call it. they leave here in freezing water. not just for a f
serving in iraq and afghanistan. this event held on september 11, 2012 is hosted by the navy memorial here in washington d.c. it's just under an hour. [applause] the mac thanks to all my classmates and coeditors and mentors who helped make this possible. in february to the night vision this book. everything is happening for me as an active-duty salt and afghanistan in kandahar. i was working for general nick nicholson, doing cool things is a swell stansell are now, supporting my country. maybe i should do a book. really, compared to ben wagner? really, compared to jacob sabe? and f-18 pilot to saved the stryker battalion. well, made cbs colleague, jason jackson. the story of this book were exceptional and i that i will ask us present at 2002 it could connect the stories come from personalities together to weave together a book that could define this decade through leadership ones. so i called carol andersen. carol andersen wasserstein richard in a helicopter accident. i called her on the phone as i did all the mothers who go for the book who lost their sons and i said carol, i would like t
the royal navy needed every hand it could find on deck. the consequent british practice of boarding american ships to round up having a bound british seamen provoked enormous controversy more so because the efforts could at times sweep americans into british it nets. in the midst of such moral and political confusion both americans and the british made scattershot efforts to maintain the better claim to virtue. the rising crisis with britain in the early years of the 1800s compounded every element of the promise rapped the problems of population in the united states. americans faced a especially important intellectual academic adversary in the form of the british theorist. thomas malfac . he was author of a book you probably heard of essay on the principlep population. you may not know its subtitle. it was an inquiry into our prospects respecting the future removal or mitigation of the evils that it occasions. it was first published in the england in 1798 and it was reprinted in the united states in a local edition by 18 owe 3. malpass offered his model of population not as scientific extrac
army and navy to provide at that time. so anderson really said look, i can't maintain myself fear, but there's no way you can, help me. anderson fully expected he would be told to withdraw. now, when you come down to the final crisis when lincoln decides what he's going to do is to send an expedition that will provide supplies to major anderson, though he did not send troops or munitions, when the confederate commander in charleston sent his delegation out to anderson to kill anderson that you've got to surrender, or we will reduce you. anderson at the point told them, look, i've got to leave in two days, by the 15th of april, so that's a factor he said if you come at me i will fight back. ball regard census information to my comment because he relies this is a question of peace and what the the work in the coming as conduct for modern, look, if anderson was this what exactly is going to leave, then you don't take them out. otherwise you reduce the ford. anderson said to them, i will leave at noon on april 15, unless, unless i was a different borders from my government are i am re
, which is the air force version of the navy school. i darted down the navy school, kind of an abbreviated exchange. it is okay, but they're not half of what we are. because the air force? okay, good. never mind the football game today, that's irrelevant. the whole taking off and landing on a carrier. it's a good school, but wasn't anything like ours. ours is six months long and utterly miserable. i came out of that a change to the reading. some say for the better. i lost almost all of my cockiness, quite a few tailfeathers and spent the next decade be the weapons and tactics officer at different levels. i was at khobar towers would not place blew up. two-faced member that? may not want to sit too close to me because i'm always in the wrong place at the wrong time. yeah, i was there when that place blew up. i don't think any of us were thinking about terrorism than the way thought of now. it wasn't something we were prepared to fight. my generation was geared up to fight the soviet union. i asked my teenage daughter, you know, she says what's wrong with russia? i said it's not russia, it's
him successfully beyond united states army and navy so rarely he said i cannot maintain myself but there is no way you can come help me. he expected he would be told to withdraw. coming down to the final crisis to send an expedition not to send troops more munitions beauregard said his delegation to tell anderson you have to surrender or we will reduce you perk up that point* he said i have to leave in today's i will fly back. beauregard took the information to mcgovern a. it was over peace anwr. if he would specify when he will leave them don't take him out. then anderson said i will leave it noon april 15. unless i receive different orders from my government or i reinforced at that time the confederates new the relief mission was on route to some of that answer would not do because he did not promise unequivocal a cell he was told firing would commence properly. and it did. he never made the proposal of those terms. >> but just to speculate did abraham lincoln know what was going to have been in fort sumner? >> he did the trick anybody. he had every reason and to expect seven
that will check the asian pacific century, our diplomatic corps, our business community, our navy and air force, a recognition that this is where the challenges are and there is a really exciting ferment of ideas and bubbling up of initiatives, people to people, you name it, the tape lace across the realm and there's nothing like success to make people want to remain engaged. we spent a lot and we've lost a lot in some of these other places. our investments in a shed generally have paid off remarkably, even when we have not been fundamentally successful in the evaluation stage. that is likely to continue into the future. >> a quick comment on this theme of our domestic challenges because i agree with what chris said 100% about our competitor versus the entire world. i would amend your statement a little bit. it's challenges on society and if we get our act together, the polarization, the lack of bipartisanship now. that is the single best thing we can do for china policy and what we can do for foreign policy in general. it will validator system, give us the resources we need. and if we do that,
, and navy air force marine corps it's about the joint force. it's about the synergy of all the service in order to meet our nations needs and that's energy and balance necessary to move forward and implement a new strategy. one of the issues i always have is when people want to do an evaluation in the army they look at brigade combat teams. how many do you have and how many t. need for the future? that is fundamental to what we do however people tend to forget many other parts about the army that are so critical to us supporting the joint force. 75% of their personal force of special operations forces is the army. we can't forget about that. we are responsive and we have to make sure we stay responsive to civil authorities and we have continued to make sure we have the right capability to respond and as you see what's going on today up in the northeast. we have provided a broad range of essential services today to combat and commanders and that includes intelligence, surveillance recognizance for off the geographical combatant commanders. would provide air and missile defense. geograp
service and for outstanding public service. user doesn't officer in the u.s. navy, the joint chiefs of staff, and chief of naval operations special intelligence unit. doctor campbell received his ba from university of california san diego, certificate in music and political philosophy from the university and soviet armenia, and his doctorate in international relations from oxford university what he was a marshall scholar. to my any of his richard solomon who is the assistant of state for for east asia and pacific affairs in 1989-1982 for president george h. w. bush. he served as president of united states institute of peace since 1993 during which time he oversaw its growth into a center of international conflict management analysis in applied programs. during his service in government doctor solomon negotiate the cambodia peace treaty, the first united nations permanent peacemaking agreement, a leading role in a dialogue commission issues between the united states and the koreans. helped establish aipac, the asia-pacific economic cooperation initiative ambiguous negotiations, japan
is the air force version of the navy school. i'd already done the navy school, kind of abbreviated exchange. it was okay but they're not half of what we are, so -- you guys air force? good. so never mind the football game today. they -- that's irrelevant. that whole landing on a carrier thing, they can keep it. it was good school but not like ours, ours is six months long and utterly miserable. i came out of that a changed human being. some say for the better. i lost almost all of my cockiness. quite a few tail feathers, and then spent the next decade being a weapons and tactics officer at different levels in the fighter wing. i was at kobar towers when that blew up. remember that? may not want to sit too close to me. i'm in the wrong place at the wrong time. i was there when that place blew up. we hadn't really -- i don't think any of us were thinking about terrorism then the way it's thought of now. i wasn't something we were prepared to fight. my generation was geared up to fight the soviet union. i ask my teenage daughter -- she say, what wrong with russia? i said, it's not russia. it w
. and although we sometimes talk about army navy air force marine corps, it is about the joint force. it is about the synergy that is gained of all the services in order for us, nor to meet our nation's needs and the synergy and balance necessary to move forward and it limits the new strategy. one of the issues i have come when people do an evaluation of the army, look at brigade combat team, how many brigade combat team compounded when you for the future. that's important to that's fundamental to what we do. however, people tend to forget many other parts about the army that is so critical to us supporting the joint force. first, 75% of the operational forces special operations forces is army. can't forget about that. we are responsive camera to make sure we stay responsive to civil authorities and for the example we continue to make sure we have the right capability to respond to wildfires, hurricane relief, and as you see what's going on today up in the northeast. we provide a broad range of essential services today to combat and commanders that includes intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissa
capacities as a regional, to as a combatant commanders. he's a vice chief of staff of the navy. he touched the military and more profound ways than many flag officers did and grout of the conversation about how this is an important ingredient to our success, but we don't really understand it that well. we as a policy community don't understand it so well. so we thought we ought to learn from this and bill agreed he would be willing to lead this effort for us and i'm very grateful. we decided that we should capture the wisdom and judgment that had been developed over the last ten years by real-life experiences. so the document that you have all received i hope is a summation of a series of interviews that the staff has conducted, and i think it's going to be very valuable, very valuable over time. several of the colleagues that are involved in this are going to be here in this panel discussion. that's going to be rear admral tom cullison, dr. ellen embrey, ambassador cameron hume and dr. connie mariano vv we are glad you are not able only to participate but share your perspective today. i t
educational opportunities i joined the u.s. 80 -- navy and spend four years in the military and applied for the u.s. border patrol and i was blessed with a tremendous career, tremendous family. i ended up along the border as u.s. border patrol agents going through the ranks and started using what i felt was a talent i was blessed with, being able to infiltrate drug cartels, human smuggling cartels and did more undercover work than any federal agent in the history of the government's over a 30 year career and i am happy to share those experiences because they are unique because i was the only federal agent who experienced being smuggled from mexico to the interior of the united states, going through travels by myself in the back of the trunk of a car, things of that nature. it was quite dramatic but something i did with a lot of pride because i felt going after those seeking a better life in the united states i share those stories with you in my book the shadow catcher. >> there are many powerful moments you describe. i am wondering if you could share a couple of those with us. in partic
.s. paper. there are a lot of pictures of the pirate ship that was seized by the argentine navy but let me tell you something. that is the biggest battle on this planet which is not about syria. it's not about pakistan. that sailing ship is the naval action of the biggest battle on this planet. paul the vulture singer, and romney are co romney has a piece of it. a small piece but you know a couple hundred million. a small piece. these vultures have attacked the nation of argentina saying that all the money that argentina once owned many years ago, new york banks -- do we care about the story oh argentine bank. argentine defaulted. no they didn't. they said we are not paying you a serious raid and if they did well and they did because they were not being killed, we will give you peace of argentina. they have citibank in jpmorgan and we have stock in argentina which was doing very well and then call the vulture singer swooped down and said that's fine just like he did with delphi and the auto parts. i have got you by the parts in detroit and now i have you in argentina. he doesn't want to ju
are the aircraft carriers, nuclear submarines or whatever, you know, the navy at this point is just about power production. it is not clear that we need to be protecting our power everywhere in the world for that we need to be fighting undeclared wars on five continents. basically on all continents, including this one if you count the drug war and everything we have done in central and south america. you know, supposedly fighting drugs. we need to really rethink how much we want to intervene and how much we want our noses in other people's business. someone doing that is going to say, you're going to have to put up with a lot of people and coverage in "the new york times." some say why won't america come and help us. but the people should be helping themselves. they shouldn't be coming to the united states is to did help. the purpose of this country is to keep her own people and own interests. >> if qadhafi massacres of people, that's okay? >> no, it's not something that i have a solution here. >> first being that any cut in government spending on defense related programs means, by definition,
school, served as commission officer in the u.s. navy and was an assistant u.s. attorney in new york. please welcome alan morrison. [applause] >> thank you. i also have the distinction that i read and commented on stewart -- john stuart's book. no one has come after me today. the biggest incendiary, you should have read the draft i read. i am one of the few lawyers who practices in front of the supreme court who did not file a brief in the fisher case. let's begin by remembering that fisher is a concrete lawsuit and not an academic debate about the values of affirmative-action. the question in this case is the university of texas violated the equal protection clause in connection with undergraduate admission programs and abigail fisher when she was injured by what the university of texas did? i want to start by explaining a little more than stuart did about the admission program and what it is supposed to do and what it is not supposed to do and what it does or doesn't do so we have the top 10%. this guarantees anyone who graduates in the top 10% of their high school class in texas,
and is a graduate of yale university and harvard law school served as a commission officer in the u.s. navy and was an assistant u.s. attorney in new york. please welcome alan morrison. [applause] >> i also have the distinction of two things. i read and comment on stuart's book. i don't get a medal of honor for that. my name is and the acknowledgement so no one has come after me yet and if you think it is incendiary. second, and also one of the few lawyers and practices in the supreme court who didn't file a brief and the fisher case. okay, so let's begin by remembering that fisher is a concrete lawsuit and not an academic debate about the values of affirmative action the university of texas violate the equal protection clause in connection with its undergraduate emission program and did abigail fisher was she injured by what the university of texas did and i want to start by explaining the emissions program will and it's not supposed to do and what it does and doesn't do. as we have the top 10%. this guarantees anyone that graduates the top 10% of their high school class. if you want to be
this was the scene outside portsmouth navy yard in portsmouth, new hampshire, and i had never seen anything like it. there's a ship change. i don't know how many thousands of people come through the gate and general hague was there with some of his campaign workers and it was like he was a positive magnet and they were a post any magnet and people were just veering away from him. he literally had to run from one side of the gallet to the other side -- gate to the other side, there were two openings, trying to find people to shake hands with and this was one of the moments where he had gone over to the other side and just called out to this worker and just stepped into shake his hand. >> what did you think of him? >> again, he's a very interesting man, very forceful, articulate, intelligent. obviously the voters didn't consider him presidential cal -- caliber. >> this picture of bruce babbitt. >> this is what candidates have to go through, and everybody is saying, oh, that's a bell helmet, bicycle riding, that's a cold weather face bask r mask. -- mask he has on. it was another photo op and it was a
no, it's the navy powers. as the maritime powers like britain used to be her today the united states. and then, there was an american geographer called saul: and he put these two ideas together and were the two great powers, the land power and the sea power come together, he called the shadow belt. in the middle east is located in one of the world great shadow belt. the interesting thing about them is that small states have the ability to shift the power from one large side to the other, simply because it depends on which side they're on or which side they decide to shift to. and in the middle east, the old part of that shot about with syria and is today. but after the fall of the soviet union, after the end of the cold war, there is another heart since the entire eastward movement of the middle east place at that time when the central asian states joined the middle east, when afghanistan went to the edge of the middle east. and so today, we had a second part inside the middle east and that is iran. those two hearts with their particular allies are causing this a growing second glob
entirely current estimates required strength of the army and navy and air force. a subsequent study prepared for the secretary of state and assessed that any peacekeeping role for the united states and palestine would require an initial deployment of 104,000 troops and that the troop requirements would triple in the event of any outbreaks of conflict. the proposal to saddle britain with the security of a partition palestine is a particular significance. general marshall and most every other american wartime military leader had gone through many exasperating experiences. the wartime policies were colored by the postwar british empire. this has been a source of friction tween prime minister churchill, who was catalyzed by roosevelt in these memorable book writings. it goes even more detail. reactions to their british counterparts. general marshall had been involved with all of this british town stuff. it was later informed the british and french israeli forces restore egyptian control over the canal. president eisenhower's actions, like general marshall and the joint chiefs for any po
, and then there was another side, the navy powers or today, the united states. then, there was an american that they called donald fuller. if you put these two ideas together and where the two great powers, the land power in the seapower come together, we call it the [inaudible] the middle east is located in one of the worlds great ones. small states have the ability to shift the power from one large side to the other. simply because it depends on which side they are on or which side they decide to ship two. in the middle east, the old part of that shadowbox wisteria, and is today. but after the fall of the soviet union, after the end of the cold war. there was another fight. since the entire movement took place at that time when a secretary of state joined the middle east and today we have a second heart inside the middle east, and that is iran. those two hearts, with their particular allies are probably the growing second global cold war. now, the first indication that we have is the reincarnation of the second arab cold war. this, we know, we have heard about it being the conflict and proxy war between
he was in the navy, mark, speaking of war, could you please give us just a couple of minutes talk about the vietnam years and its effects on lbj and those around him? >> i think lbj was very reluctant about vietnam. he was ambivalent about it from the very beginning. i think that there are a couple of phone conversations. the crown jewel of the lbj library. 643 hours of recordings of his phone conversation. there are two in particular. to that really illuminate how he felt. the first was with richard russell, who i mentioned earlier, who had said, you know, if this burden were thrust on me, mr. president, i would decline to fight the war in vietnam. and it just seems like another thing and lbj said i have been thinking the same way ever since i came to office. and george bundy, his national security adviser, lbj talked about laying awake all night and thinking about the war. and he said that it is halting. he says what is beyond me? what is vietnam to this country? and he realizes. it is of no great consequence to the united states. it doesn't mean much. except for the fact that i
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)

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